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NASA at Your Table: Where Food Meets Methane

Methane Emission

Methane Emissions Today, human sources are responsible for 60% of global methane emissions, coming primarily  from the burning of fossil fuels, decomposition in landfills and the agriculture sector. Nearly a quarter of methane emissions can be attributed to agriculture, much of which is from raising livestock. Rice cultivation and food waste are also important sources of agricultural methane, as nearly a third of…

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Pacific Quest Partners with Cool Effect for Reduced Carbon Footprint.

HILO, Hawaii — Paicific Quest has partnered with Cool Effect to offset a carbon footprint of over 200 tonnes annually. Cool Effect is a 501c non-profit organization that partners with private and public entities, including 3M, American Airlines, and Sales Force, to offset operational carbon emissions. Cool Effect funds novel emission reduction projects around the world, and provides a transparent, measureable and efficient operation–with 90%…

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Seeing the Sun in a New Light

Innovative observations of the solar corona could improve space weather forecasts Using a NOAA telescope in a novel way, researchers from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) working in NCEI captured the first-ever images of dynamics in the sun’s elusive middle corona. The observations, from the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) on NOAA’s GOES-17 satellite, reveal how the middle corona…

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4 safety tips for summer weather hazards

weather

It’s what we’ve waited for: Summer! Though the season brings longer, sunnier days, it also comes with life-threatening weather hazards such as extreme heat, rip currents, and thunderstorms and lightning. 1. Excessive heat. It’s a killer.  Heat is one of the most deadly weather hazards, so don’t underestimate it. Warm temperatures can quickly rise to dangerous levels — especially in parked…

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When to Expect the Warmest Day of the Year

Warmest Day

During the summer months, most areas in the United States approach their highest temperatures for the year. To give you a better idea of the warmest time of year for your area, NCEI has created “Warmest Day of the Year” maps with the help of Climate.gov for the contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. The maps are derived from the 1991–2020 U.S. Climate Normals, NCEI’s 30-year averages…

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What is a North American Monsoon? (video)

  The North American monsoon, variously known as the Southwest monsoon, the Mexican monsoon, the New Mexican monsoon, or the Arizona monsoon, is a pattern of pronounced increase in thunderstorms and rainfall over large areas of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, typically occurring between July and mid-September. During the monsoon, thunderstorms are fueled by daytime heating and build up during the late afternoon and early evening. Typically, these storms…

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What is a Haboob?

haboob

  A haboob (Arabic: هَبوب‎, romanized: habūb, lit. ’blasting/drifting’) is a type of intense dust storm carried on an atmospheric gravity current, also known as a weather front. Haboobs occur regularly in dry land area regions throughout the world. Like haboobs that occur in the Middle East, haboob occurrences in North America are often created by the collapse of a thunderstorm. This is a local or mesoscale event, and at times of extreme drought they…

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What is a Dust Devil? (video)

dust devil

  A dust devil is a strong, well-formed, and relatively short-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a metre wide and a few metres tall) to large (more than 10 m wide and more than 1 km tall). The primary vertical motion is upward. Dust devils are usually harmless, but can on rare occasions grow large enough to pose a threat to both people and property….

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New “Destructive” Severe Thunderstorm Warning category to trigger Wireless Emergency Alerts on mobile phones

July 22, 2021 – Severe thunderstorms can be life-threatening, but not all severe storms are the same. Hazardous conditions range from tornadoes, large hail storms, and widespread straight-line winds called derechoes, to cloud-to-ground lightning and flash flooding. Starting August 2, the National Weather Service will better convey the severity and potential impacts from thunderstorm winds and hail by adding a “damage…

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