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A Grilled Take on a Traditional Italian Meal

(Family Features) Warm weather means grilling season is back, but evenings spent around the grill are no longer just for hot dogs and burgers. This summer, impress family and friends with creative new recipes that put a spin on your traditional go-to meals.

To start, try bringing other cultural influences to the table. Get inspired by this Sweet Italian Sausage Polenta, starring flavor-packed Carando Sweet Italian Sausage and vinegar-laced peppers over soft, creamy polenta. Simple and satisfying, this recipe may just earn a permanent spot on your summer menu.

Whether you’re grilling for neighbors or gathering the family for a weeknight meal, the sausage is convenient, easy to prepare and can help turn any occasion into a memorable one. Made from 100% pork and loaded with traditional Italian herbs and spices, it pairs perfectly with this creamy polenta, as well as pizzas, sandwiches, kebabs and more.

Find more ways to put your own spin on summer grilling at Carando.com.

Sweet Italian Sausage Polenta

Total time: 35 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1 package Carando Sweet Italian Sausage
  • 8 cups chicken stock
  • 2 cups dry polenta
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 red bell pepper, julienned
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, julienned
  • 1 medium yellow onion, julienned
  • 1 tablespoon fresh garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup white wine
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  1. Heat grill to medium-low. Grill sausages 15-20 minutes, using tongs to turn frequently; reserve.
  2. In heavy-bottomed pot, whisk stock and polenta; bring to boil. Cook, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes, or until thick and creamy.
  3. Remove polenta from heat and whisk in butter and cheese. Reserve until ready to serve.
  4. Heat pan over medium-high heat. Add olive oil, peppers, onions and garlic; and saute until vegetables soften and just begin to color.
  5. Deglaze pan with white wine and reduce by half. Add vinegar, honey and oregano; cook until reduced by half.
  6. Add sausages to pan to warm.
  7. When sausages are warm, place polenta on large platter then top with sausages, peppers and onions.


SOURCE:
Carando

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